Last edited by Tazahn
Sunday, August 2, 2020 | History

3 edition of Shalom! The Biblical concept of peace found in the catalog.

Shalom! The Biblical concept of peace

by Douglas James Harris

  • 191 Want to read
  • 9 Currently reading

Published by Baker Book House in Grand Rapids .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Shalom (The Hebrew word),
  • Peace -- Biblical teaching.

  • Edition Notes

    Bibliography: p. 65-73.

    Statement[by] Douglas J. Harris.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsBS680.P4 H37
    The Physical Object
    Pagination79 p.
    Number of Pages79
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL5703802M
    ISBN 100801040140
    LC Control Number70143278

      "Peace" is a very common word in English, that means different things to different people. It's also a very important word in the Bible that refers not only. The sense of completion listeners experience in that moment is similar to the biblical concept of shalom or peace. Paul speaks of this peace when he talks about the benefits of praying rather than worrying. Only when we pray do we experience the sense of wholeness and rightness that Jesus alone can bring.

    “Peace” is a common word in many languages, and it can mean different things, though we often think of it as “absence of war.” In Hebrew, the word for peace, “shalom” (שָׁלוֹם), refers not just to the absence of conflict, but to something better replacing is all about things being as they should be. Bible Study on Peace - Concept of Shalom. Jesus once said: 27 Peace I leave with you; my peace I give unto you: not as the world giveth, give I unto you. Let not your heart be troubled, neither let it be fearful. ()The word Jesus likely used in Hebrew was Shalom - the word of greeting that meant "Peace.".

    Book Description. When we read the Bible, we often miss the full meaning of the text because we are dealing with cross-cultural issues. The Hebrew word shalom, like the Arab word salaam, has a richness that is simply not captured by the word “peace” in English language Bible a result, there is a “missing piece” when we read Biblical passages on this important subject. Behold! upon the door of entrance, "Peace be with you all that are in Christ Jesus"- (1 Peter ).Jehovah Shalom! The Lord revealed this name to Gideon by the rock in Ophra, and Gideon built an altar there unto the Lord and called it by that name (Judges ).Yes! by the rock in Ophrah, Gideon had seen the "Prince of Peace-had seen Him face to face" (Judges ) and here he was reconciled.


Share this book
You might also like
Bi-Radiant Oven a Low-Energy Oven System

Bi-Radiant Oven a Low-Energy Oven System

Forty-four years of Bird & Bull

Forty-four years of Bird & Bull

Basic fibre optics

Basic fibre optics

Survey of fertility and mortality in Poona district

Survey of fertility and mortality in Poona district

Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering examination papers 1996.

Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering examination papers 1996.

Outlines of theology.

Outlines of theology.

Early manor and plantation houses of Maryland

Early manor and plantation houses of Maryland

Mrs Warrens Profession

Mrs Warrens Profession

Concerning penal laws

Concerning penal laws

Essays on men and manners

Essays on men and manners

New-Englands true interest; not to lie: or, A treatise declaring from the word of truth the terms on which we stand, and the tenure by which we hold our hitherto-continued precious and pleasant things.

New-Englands true interest; not to lie: or, A treatise declaring from the word of truth the terms on which we stand, and the tenure by which we hold our hitherto-continued precious and pleasant things.

Microcomputers in Biochemistry

Microcomputers in Biochemistry

Irish art industry

Irish art industry

Shalom! The Biblical concept of peace by Douglas James Harris Download PDF EPUB FB2

The ancient Hebrew concept of peace, rooted in the word "shalom," meant wholeness, completeness, soundness, health, safety and prosperity, carrying with it the implication of permanence. Shalom and peace. A Study on Biblical Concepts of Peace in the Old and New Testaments.

“At its heart the biblical concept of shalom is about God’s vision for the emphatic goodness of all relationships,” Harper says.

In the Bible, the word shalom Author: Lesli White. Shalom also means peace with others, peace between parties. It means the end of hostilities and war (Deuteronomy ; Judges ). The wise woman of Abel Beth Maakah maintained her city’s shalom, its peacefulness, by averting a siege and war (2 Samuel –22).

Yoder provides a helpful addition to work on Biblical peace studies by underscoring the importance of the concept of Shalom throughout the Old and New Testaments. Unfortunately, his approach suffers from an over reliance on Marxist ideology and he has the tendency to oversimplify complex topics such as substitutionary atonement and New Cited by: Shalom.

The Biblical Concept of Peace. Douglas James Harris. Baker Book House, - Peace - 79 pages. 0 Reviews. From inside the book.

What people are saying - Write a review. We haven't found any reviews in the usual places. Common terms and phrases. By sharing God’s uncontainable peace with others, we become just like Jesus.

There are many other examples worthy of study regarding shalom. Peace is so much more than the world’s one-sided definition.

We must find our understanding of it through the Bible, from the God of Israel. We will need the true meaning of Shalom in the days ahead. It depicts the concept of peace expressed in the blessing of Aaron found in Numberswherein it sums up all other blessings and is closely associated with the presence of God.

Peace is the result of God’s presence in a person’s life as God is the source of peace (Psalm ). The Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology has a nice summary of shalom: "The biblical concept of peace rests heavily on the Hebrew root "sh-l-m", which means to be complete or to be sound.

The verb conveys both a dynamic and a static meaning—to be complete or whole or to live well. Peace. The Meaning of Peace. In English, the word "peace" conjures up a passive picture, one showing an absence of civil disturbance or hostilities, or a personality free from internal and external strife.

The biblical concept of peace is larger than that and rests heavily on the Hebrew root slm, which means "to be complete" or "to be sound. Shalom (Hebrew: שָׁלוֹם ‎ shalom; also spelled as sholom, sholem, sholoim, shulem) is a Hebrew word meaning peace, harmony, wholeness, completeness, prosperity, welfare and tranquility and can be used idiomatically to mean both hello and goodbye.

As it does in English, it can refer to either peace between two entities (especially between man and God or between two countries), or to. The word Shalom is as ancient as the land itself. It is peppered throughout Scripture, embedded in the familiar names of cities and people such as Jerusalem (foundation of peace) and King Solomon.

Shalom means everything which makes for a man’s highest good. It has been well said that "Peace in the Jewish sense is the symphony of life made meaningful through a right relationship with God." Biblical peace is unrelated to circumstances—it is a goodness of life and satiety of one's soul that is not touched by what happens on the outside.

peace with God, especially in covenant relation: Isaiah ברית covt. of my peace, compare Numbers (P), Ezekiel ; Ezekielalso Malachi ; ׳שׁ ׳י as name of altar Judges ; ׳י subject לְ ׳שׁם שׁ Numbers (P); ׳בֵּרַךְ בשׁ Psalm ; ׳חפץ שׁ Psalm ; לְ ׳עשׂה שׁ.

“Shalom” can be used generally to describe the well-being of persons or communities, and “peace” is a particular and common development of that sense.

There is “a time for war, and a time for peace [shalom],” Ecclesiastes tells us. A related meaning is physical health: in Isaiah it is used in this sense as a metaphor. WHAT IS SHALOM.

The Hebrew word for peace is “shalom.” While the best English synonym for “shalom” is peace, it is incomplete and an insufficient understanding of the concept. Shalom takes on a variety of meanings in the Old Testament.

Gaining a comprehensive understanding of biblical peace requires taking a deeper look at the word itself. First appearing during the peace-loving s, this book now receives a welcome reintroduction as part of Chalice Press's Understanding Biblical Themes series.

Brueggemann, professor of Old Testament at Columbia Theological Seminary, looks at the protean concept of "shalom" and its relation to concerns today for peace and s: 6. ISBN: OCLC Number: Description: 79 pages 21 cm: Contents: An iridescent concept --God the giver of shalom --Eschatological outreach --Pre-New Testament connections --Peace and the mission of Jesus --Peace and salvation --Peace in sibility: [by] Douglas J.

Harris. Shalom: A Biblical/Theological Vision for God’s People THE CONCEPT OF SHALOM Shalom is a fitting place to begin a discussion of the biblical basis for anti-racism and reconciliation.

A society characterized by shalom embraces the core values of peace, justice, and. The biblical concept of peace does not focus on the absence of trouble. Biblical peace is unrelated to circumstances; it is a goodness of life that is not touched by what happens on the outside.

You may be in the midst of great trials and still have biblical peace. After all, if peace means to get along with others then arguing is the exact opposite of securing peace. The problem with this is that shalom in the Bible refers to a reckoning.

It is the making of all things right again. Such an understanding of the concept changes our thinking about fighting itself.

The Hebrew word for peace is shalom which is derived from one of the names of God. Hebrew root word for "complete" or "whole" implying that according to Judaism and the teachings of the Torah, only when there is a true state of "wholeness" meaning that everything is "complete" does true "peace" reign.Rather, shalom captures God’s desire that all of creation – human to God, human to human, and human to nature – be in harmony (see here Nicholas Wolterstorff’s book Until Justice and Peace Embrace).

Not surprisingly, the Bible also links these two words mishpat (justice) and shalom. For example, in Isaiah the prophet brings an. Peace is a desired status in each of these arenas, and shalom is often tied to a covenant or a promise kept.

A familiar friend (literally, “friend of my peace” in Psalm ) is one with whom you would be at ease, a trusted companion. “Peace” was the standard greeting (1 Samuel ), still used in many cultures today.